Halloween worksheets for your English class










If you live in the UK or the USA, the end of October means more little kids dressed as skeletons knocking on your door and screaming ‘trick or treat’ before you dish out the sweets.

Here’s an old favourite that I’ve used on Hallowe’en for many years. If you don’t want to make the first worksheet too easy, then cut off the bottom section so they don’t have the names of the halloween creatures to help them. It’s worth remembering that these monsters play a very big part in UK and US culture, so this might be a really good lesson for higher level students, especially when they have to discuss what the various monsters do.

Chatting about superstitions in the second worksheets is also very interesting and whilst some are the same the world over, others are very strange.

Here’s the lesson https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/halloween.doc

There’s another lesson on Vampires here:


and a lesson on Zombies here:


and if you like superheroes, there’s a lesson on them here:


The zombie lesson – reading and discussion lesson for Halloween

Chris Speck

Can’t be bothered to read the blog?  I wouldn’t bother either, here’s the worksheet:  https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/the-zombie-lesson.doc

I quite like zombie films and most of my pre-intermediate and intermediate students do as well. Here is a three part Zombie lesson to get them talking and reading about the most popular undead monster in modern culture.

Pre- reading. – You can dictate these questions or cut them up and ask students to read them together

Reading – You could dictate a few comprehension questions about this or blank out a few of the words to make it a gap fill exercise.

Discussion – ask students in pairs to make their own zombie apocalypse plan outlining what they and their partner would do to survive the zombies. I put a few sentences students could finish but they could write anything. Help them out by giving them some ideas. What would they do if there really…

View original post 76 more words

Using smart devices in class – challenge or opportunity? — Oxford University Press

Thomas Healy is one of the authors of Smart Choice as well as an Assistant Professor in the Intensive English Program at the Pratt Institute, New York City. A full time instructor, he presents regularly on how to adapt traditional classroom materials to meet the needs of the Selfie Generation, and how to use widely available and […]

via Using smart devices in class – challenge or opportunity? — Oxford University Press

Halloween English – The Vampire Lesson

Here’s another lesson for your ESOL, ESL or EFL students tapping the now mainstream interest in Vampires. Get the worksheet straight away by clicking here – https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/the-vampire-lesson.doc

Whether your students enjoyed the seminal video game Vampire: The Masquerade – bloodlines a few years ago or they enjoy The Twilight series of films or the TV shows True Blood or The Vampire Diaries, this lesson might be up their street.

Not everyone likes vampires, so I’d suggest you be careful with this one. Don’t use it with kids or those that are easily offended. Culturally, these kind of vampires are very ‘western’ and so if your students are not familiar with modern, American mythology then this probably won’t work. The Chinese have their own versions of vampires and so do a lot of other cultures…

There’s no special way to run the lesson, just follow the activities on the worksheet. There are broken lines around the worksheet so you can cut the sections up with a pair of scissors if you don’t want students to do it all at once.

Here’s the worksheet again – https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/the-vampire-lesson.doc

Hapland- IELTS and Video Games – Reading Instructions

Hapland is a very frustrating flash game. http://foon.uk/farcade/hapland/

Read the instructions below to complete it.

If you like video games, walkthroughs are great way to practise reading. Following complex instructions to complete a task will give you some INTERESTING reading practice.


Basically the idea of the game is to get the little man to safety byclicking on different parts of the picture in the right order.


a)    Open all the windows and turn the red arrow around.

b)    Open the hatch on the right, click the yellow arrow to get a man out.

c)     Click on the man to fire one round in the low position to drop the bridge down.

d)    Click the cannon to move it up. Fire the second round up at the bell and click the spear thing so it goes the other way JUST after the round hits the bell

e)    Fire the next two rounds at the bridge, but click the bridge to as they hit it to knock them in the air and explode without causing damage.

f)      Click the light bulb a few times next to the man at the bottom to get him to smash it.

g)    Fire the last round in the low position, and the bottom man will pick it up and open the door with it.

h)    Now click the man by the machine so he gets in it, and click the yellow arrow to get another guy out, get him to fire the other man up at the bell.

i)      The man by the bell will move the tower over if you click him. Then click the spear thing. Now keep clicking the bell till it falls. No more land mine.

j)        Click the door in the bottom left so the man comes out and JUST as he goes in the door on the right, click the man at the bottom. A dog tries to chase him, but the falling concrete stops it.

k)      You did it!

For more of the same check out Richard L King’s great book below




IELTS, TOEFL Academic reading: Read quicker! I need more time!


There’s not enough time!


If only I had more time…I could do better if I had more time. I need more time.

Slow down! There are no short cuts!

Academic reading tests are hard because they don’t give you much time. You need to be able to read faster! Here are three simple tips that will help you read more quickly.

1. Change your way of thinking.

If you want to succeed you will have to ENJOY READING.

Read something you like – do you like football? Aeroplanes? Video Games?


2. You will only get better at reading if you READ!

Read 1 article a day for 15 minutes. Try this for a month.

No excuses!

You can find good, free articles here.




3. Learn to skim and scan

Reading techniques help you find information quickly.

Download our worksheet here.

improve reading

For more help with academic reading. Check out Richard L King’s book Teach Yourself IELTS reading.





Big list of antonyms for academic English : IELTS, TOEFL and TOIEC



Here’s a great list of academic antonyms to help you with your IELTS speaking and writing.

Lists are great, but how can you use them? Do you learn them? Do you just read them? What do you do? Read the advice below.

  1. Read through this list and circle 10-15 antonym pairs that you don’t know and learn them. Test yourself on them.
  2. Read through the list. Choose ten hard pairs you don’t know, print them off and stick them on your wall / toilet wall / fridge door – anywhere you will look, often
  3. Play a game with them like the awesome word frog game http://www.arcademics.com/games/frog/frog.html
  4. Play pelmanism. Choose ten you think are useful. Write them on small pieces of paper. Put them face down on a table. Now turn each one over and try to match the pairs.