IELTS Reading – Multiple Choice Questions

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Selecting the right option from a list of possible answers is probably the most common assessment method in the world. Such questions are easy to set and mark and are a common feature of exams and test across the globe, including the IELTS reading examination.

Advantages of this method of assessment

This type of question is quick to administer and to check, and, provided they are carefully written, can also be a good indication of whether a candidate understands a particular theory or text. These types of questions can assess a range of different types of information from individual words to comprehension. Modern technology has taken advantage of this form of assessment and even paper based multiple choice exams can be marked very quickly by machines, students shade in a box on an exam paper and these can be scanned by a computer at a fantastic speed. This makes a test both cheap to administer and cheap to mark.

Drawbacks of multiple choice questions

There are quite a few criticisms of multiple choice questions. For a start they can’t check deep knowledge of a subject in the way that a question with even a very short answer can. Indeed, a candidate can guess the answers and get a question correct without having any knowledge at all. Statistically, someone randomly choosing an answer would have a one in four chance of getting it right depending on how many answers there were to choose from.

How multiple choice questions are used in the IELTS exam

On academic IELTS papers, multiple choice questions are used fairly sparingly and often in a more complex way than traditional multi-choice answer questions. Candidates are sometimes given a series of answers in a box, they are then given a number of questions and asked to match the questions with the answers. Another trick is to ask candidates to choose two answers from a list after having chosen just one in a previous multiple choice question.

How to tackle multiple choice questions

Firstly, don’t assume that the answer will be simple, read the question and make sure you understand what the task is. Look for negatives such as ‘which of the following is NOT…’. Attempt to eliminate the answers that are incorrect and by doing this you should be left with the correct one.

Also, try not to spend a long time on just one question. If you really can’t figure out the answer it’s best just to use your judgement, choose one and then move on.  You won’t lose any marks on the IELTS reading exam for making an educated guess.

 

 


Improve your IELTS Reading speed. A worksheet.

reading-batman-splsh

 

Improve your IELTS reading speed

improve reading

It’s been a while since I’ve blogged.

Here we go again.

This week, I’ve got some great IELTS reading material to share from Richard King’s top quality book: Teach yourself IELTS reading. This time we’re looking at how to improve your reading speed on the IELTS reading exam.

Thanks for the materials Rich! You can buy his book from Amazon here:

TYIR

 


Buying Christmas Presents – IELTS reading

 

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Need some quick IELTS reading practice linked to Christmas? Click below for quite an easy IELTS reading with questions on buying gifts and how difficult it is.

IELTS Christmas – buying gifts – Teach yoursefl IELTS reading

IELTS buying presents

If you liked this then why not check out Richard L King’s excellent IELTS books that focuses on reading – thanks for the materials Rich!

TYIR


IELTS Listening – Monty Python’s four Yorkshiremen

 

Here’s another lesson you can give to your IELTS students for homework or as an activity in class.

This time it’s a comedy sketch from the unique and very funny English comedians, Monty Python.

You’ll need access to YouTube.com and a way to show the video to students, this could be on their smartphones or on a projector.

Click on the picture of the worksheet below to download it.

four yorkshiremen

I’ve added YouTube link to the bottom of the page but this may change over time. You can search for the video yourself by going to YouTube and writing ‘Four Yorkshiremen Monty Python’.

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IELTS Reading exams: Improve your reading speed

reading-batman-splsh

 

Improve your IELTS reading speed

improve reading

It’s been a while since I’ve blogged.

Here we go again.

This week, I’ve got some great IELTS reading material to share from Richard King’s top quality book: Teach yourself IELTS reading. This time we’re looking at how to improve your reading speed on the IELTS reading exam.

Thanks for the materials Rich! You can buy his book from Amazon here:

TYIR

 


Text message abbreviations and emoticons. A lesson with a worksheet for your pre intermediate English students

Can’t be bothered to read the post and just want to see if the worksheet might be something you could use? Click here for the word document: Emoticons and text messages
Do you hate people writing ‘u’ instead of ‘you’ or ‘B4’ instead of ‘before’? Lots of people do. Is it normal to feel that in some way, the language you learn, love and use is being cheapened by it being abbreviated?
As someome who teaches and writes an awful lot, I couldn’t really care less how people spell. As long as they get their message across in the right way, then what’s the problem. You wouldn’t want students to use text message abbreviations in an exam, but in the same way you wouldn’t expect them to use long winded phrases in a text message.
Here’s a lesson that gets students to think about where emoticons come from and also teaches them the most common text and web speak abbreviations.
Here’s the link Emoticons and text messages

If you like it and use, please get in touch and tell us how it went!


Reported Speech – a quick ppt to show your intermediate ESOL/EFL students

Here’s another one from the vaults, a good introduction or warmer for your ESOL or EFL class on reported speech.

Click here to download the ppt: reported_speech_arrange_the_sentences

There’s not much to say as it’s pretty straightforward. The first slide gets students to arrange the words into meaningful reported speech sentences (some of them have more than one possible answer). Once students have done this, get them to write the sentences down as they would be in direct speech as well.

The next ten slides all have pictures of people saying things that students can report back. Have them shout out the answers at you, write them down or even work with a partner or group to get them perfectly correct.

Here’s the ppt again https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/reported_speech_arrange_the_sentences.ppt

http://www.englishlanguagespacestation.com/


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