Writing Cards – Christmas Cards for ESOL, ESL and EFL

 

SONY DSC

Can’t be bothered to read the post – Click here for the lesson on Writing Cards

cards

Sending cards is an enourmous business in the UK and the USA with the average person spending way too much time and money on them. There’s also a lot of social pressure to send and receive them especially at Christmas time. Who hasn’t been presented with a card for someone who is leaving the office, sick or getting married, and thought ‘I don’t know what to write!’?

It’s also pretty difficult for ESOL/EFL and second language English learners to write them to. I used this lesson with a group of pre-intermediate learners.

Here are the lesson stages

1. Ask the students to tell you when they last recieved a card of any description. Write a list of the cards they tell you about on the board. It might look something like this. Anniversary, wedding, congratulations, birthday, valentines, get well soon, sorry, condolences…

2. Pass out the sheet and have the students correct the mistakes then match the card messages to the people they are for.

3. Now ask students to write their own messages in response to the prompts. You could ask them to work in pairs or alone and could check the answers by getting to write on the board.

4. There are some really good electronic greetings cards on the net. You might like to show these to your students if you have an interactive whiteboad or projector.

http://www.jacquielawson.com/

Simle Box


Audiobooks – More practice for IELTS listening

Normally, I’d tell you that reading novels isn’t really going to help you get very good at IELTS academic reading….but…

…if you need some free practise for your IELTS listening, then audiobooks, might just be the right thing!

Like the radio or podcasts, you can listen to them anywhere, in the car, on your bike, in the gym or even at work. Here’s a list of places to find them.

1. Audible. You can get a month’s free trial and choose from an enormous number of audio books from Harry Potter to Emily Bronte. You can also listen to my novel ‘Warmstone’ here as well.

warmstone-flyerheights

 

2. https://librivox.org/ – totally free, LibriVox aims to have most classic literature in audio form. Click on the pictures below for Mary Shelly’s absolute classic – Frankenstein.

 

7279568-L.jpguntitled.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Culture http://www.openculture.com/freeaudiobooks 700 free audio books here – there must be something good for you to read…and free too. Click on the picture for some free Sherlock Holmes stories to listen to

images.jpg

open-culture

 

 

 


Big list of antonyms for academic English : IELTS, TOEFL and TOIEC

6ecf6f2e91b30ed7a8f09f55034ca5ef

 

Here’s a great list of academic antonyms to help you with your IELTS speaking and writing.

Lists are great, but how can you use them? Do you learn them? Do you just read them? What do you do? Read the advice below.

  1. Read through this list and circle 10-15 antonym pairs that you don’t know and learn them. Test yourself on them.
  2. Read through the list. Choose ten hard pairs you don’t know, print them off and stick them on your wall / toilet wall / fridge door – anywhere you will look, often
  3. Play a game with them like the awesome word frog game http://www.arcademics.com/games/frog/frog.html
  4. Play pelmanism. Choose ten you think are useful. Write them on small pieces of paper. Put them face down on a table. Now turn each one over and try to match the pairs.

antonyms.png

 


IELTS and TOEFL: How to use sample written essay answers…

You have a book full of sample essay answers.

What do you DO WITH THEM?

acadmeic.png

Sample essays show you how to write good academic English and give you examples of structure, vocabulary and grammatical structures.

Here are some activities you can do with sample essays and sample answers

  1. Answer the essay questions before you look at the sample answers. Then compare your answer to the sample. Ask yourself these questions:
  • How did both essays answer the question? What examples did you use? What examples did the sample answer use?
  •  What words and expressions did the essays use? Are there any expressions that sample answer used that you could steal?
  • How did both answers use paragraphs? Was the sample answer more effective than yours?
  • What grammatical structures did the answer use? Were they better than yours? How?
  1. Highlight the grammar structures or sentences that you like and learn these.
  2. Cut up the essay into sections and rearrange it.
  3. Read the essay out loud and record yourself on your mobile phone. Listen back to yourself (great for speaking practise and will help you memorise chunks of language that you know sound good).
  4. Read the sample answer with your study partner and then TALK about it!

There are sample essays all over the web.

Here are some from DC IELTS http://www.dcielts.com/ielts-essays/sample-ielts-essays/

Some from IELTS Liz http://ieltsliz.com/100-ielts-essay-questions/

For lots more help with your IELTS writing, check out Richard L King’s Teach yourself IELTS writing here:

tyiw-cover-png


IELTS and Academic writing – fixed expressions

Language is made up of chunks (see Michael Lewis – The Lexical Approach).

Like bricks that you put together, pieces of language fit together to make sentences. This is how we all use language. Learning fixed expressions and how they work will make you a more powerful writer.

…and it’s easy.

Download a copy of the fixed expressions worksheet and complete the tasks here academic-fixed-expressions-for-ielts

screen.png

More fixed expressions from around the web

Nice Fixed Expressions Quiz with a video from ESL about

Good Expressions explained from Study Lib

Here’s an awesome audio on fixed expressions from Luke’s English Podcast

For more help with your IELTS writing, check out Richard L King’s Teach yourself IELTS writing

tyiw-cover-png

 


I need reading practice- but I hate reading! IELTS / TOEFL / TOIEC

You need to practise reading…but you hate reading. You really hate it. It’s all boring. You hate reading in English.

Stop. On the internet there are a million interesting things to read.

Read Quora

Quora www.quora.com – hundreds of interesting questions answered.quara

I just visited this website to get a screen shot of it and ended up reading a question on ‘where we fall in a 1-10 scale of attractiveness’. I even watched a video too. Quora is a great website for reading things you are interested in, and if you can, answer some of the questions!

Newspapers – all over the internet and FREE

Guardian weekly – awesome free newspaper from the UK with articles on anything you are interested in.

guardianweekly2014_800_600_140908124808

the Telegraph – another great broadsheet from the UK.

kate.png

Magazines

The economist – for highbrow articles that mirror what you’ll find on your IELTS exam

f030083604

Online journals – Get to Cambridge Core and search for the subjects you are interested in – you might also learn something about your specialist field.

cambridge.png

For more help with your IELTS reading. Check out Richard L King’s book, Teach yourself IELTS reading

tyir


Halloween worksheets for your English class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/halloween.doc

If you live in the UK or the USA, the end of October means more little kids dressed as skeletons knocking on your door and screaming ‘trick or treat’ before you dish out the sweets.

Here’s an old favourite that I’ve used on Hallowe’en for many years. If you don’t want to make the first worksheet too easy, then cut off the bottom section so they don’t have the names of the halloween creatures to help them. It’s worth remembering that these monsters play a very big part in UK and US culture, so this might be a really good lesson for higher level students, especially when they have to discuss what the various monsters do.

Chatting about superstitions in the second worksheets is also very interesting and whilst some are the same the world over, others are very strange.

Here’s the lesson https://chrisspeck.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/halloween.doc

There’s another lesson on Vampires here:

bela_lugosi_as_dracula_anonymous_photograph_from_1931_universal_studios

and a lesson on Zombies here:

15166442908_ae668bd614_b

and if you like superheroes, there’s a lesson on them here:

maxresdefault